Pre ICPR Events

About

Pre ICPR Events

About

Jonathan Cohen, MSc

Technion Israel Institute of Technology

Speaker Bio

Combining a passion for science and business, I am currently undertaking dual pursuits of a PhD and an MBA at the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology. With over 12 years in the biotech industry, my expertise spans R&D, project management, plant breeding, and agronomy. Since February 2021, as a PhD Researcher at the Technion, I have been deeply engaged in psychopharmacology, studying "The effect of Psilocybin producing fungi on serotonergic disorders." This project is a testament to my commitment to pioneering research with potential implications for novel health treatments.

In parallel, I have played a pivotal role in the agricultural sector as a founder and R&D leader in multiple companies. My tenure in these roles involved spearheading initiatives for agricultural innovation and overseeing complex scientific product lifecycles, aligning with my strategic vision for industrial growth and advancement.

I am dedicated to driving innovative solutions that bridge scientific inquiry with business acumen, aiming to make a significant impact in both academia and industry.

ICPR 2024 Abstract

Comprehensive methodologies for cultivating, extracting, and characterizing metabolites in tryptamine-producing fungi, with a specific focus on their potential anti-inflammatory effects

Interest in tryptamine-producing fungi has experienced a resurgence in recent years as researchers explore the therapeutic potential of their secondary metabolites in various diseases. Psilocybin, the primary metabolite of these fungi, rapidly converts to psilocin in the body, primarily exerting its effects through serotonin receptors (5-HTr), notably 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors, leading to hallucinogenic activity. However, given the widespread distribution of serotonin receptors throughout the GI tract, it is plausible that these metabolites may have additional effects. Additionally, numerous unidentified tryptamines and other metabolites have been discovered in these fungi, yet the majority of the 200 tryptamine-producing species remain unexplored, largely due to insufficient cultivation and analytical methodologies.

 In this research, we present comprehensive methodologies for cultivating, extracting, and characterizing metabolites in tryptamine-producing fungi, with a specific focus on their potential anti-inflammatory effects. As these fungi hold promise as sources of serotonergic-modulating compounds, we aim to analyze the metabolome of various psychoactive fungi species to assess their therapeutic potential, utilizing a DSS-induced colitis in-vivo murine model. Our preliminary findings demonstrate the high potential of treating colitis inflammation using species-specific extracts, each exhibiting distinct metabolomes.

 Furthermore, we are currently investigating the active metabolites and their mechanisms of action in-vitro through co-cultured Caco2 cells with MDMs. The initial results align with our in-vivo experiments, supporting the anti-inflammatory properties of these fungal extracts. This study sheds light on the potential therapeutic applications of tryptamine-producing fungi and paves the way for further research in understanding the roles of their metabolites in treating inflammatory disorders.

© 2007-2024 ICPR by OPEN Foundation, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
© 2007-2024 ICPR by OPEN Foundation, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
© 2007-2024 ICPR by OPEN Foundation, Amsterdam, the Netherlands